ITIL V3 Service Portfolio And Life Cycle

ITIL V3 Service Portfolio And Life Cycle - Within the ITIL Service Design book you will find the Service Portfolio. The ITIL Service Portfolio contains the status of all services that IS currently offers, have offered in the past and also those that maybe simply 'pipe dreams', 'nice to have' or ideas for the future. The Portfolio is comprised of three sections:
  •     Service Pipeline
  •     Service Catalogue
  •     Retired Services
ITIL V3 Service Portfolio And Life Cycle



As a service progresses through the Service Lifecycle it is allocated a relevant status. The statuses are described below:
  • Requirements - set of outline requirements received from the business / IT for a new or changed service
  • Defined - set of requirements for a new service are being assessed, defined and documented and the Service Level Requirements (SLRs) being produced
  • Analyzed - set of requirements for a new service are being analyzed / prioritized
  • Approved - set of requirements for a new service being finalized / authorized
  • Chartered - new service requirements are being communicated, resources and budget allocated
  • Designed - the new service and its constituent components are being designed and procured as required
  • Developed - the service and its constituent components are being developed or harvested as required
  • Built - the service and its constituent components are being built
  • Test - the service and its constituent components are being tested
  • Released - the service and its constituent components are being released
  • Operational - the service and its constituent components are operational within the live environment
  • Retired - the service and its constituent components are being retired

A service at any time can be 'retired', especially when it is progressing as a 'project' in the pipeline phase. During the 'Credit Crunch' it has been necessary for many organizations to review their current Service Portfolio and in some cases 'shelve', 'moth-ball' or in other words 'retire' a service(s). In the future these services may well be re-initiated and follow the Service Lifecycle again.

Regarding the capturing of 'requirements' the Request for Change (RFC) element of Change Management would be ideally positioned.

From the 'defined' through to the 'test' service statuses a Project Management methodology (for example Prince2) could be utilized. In organizations where the number of services is considerable, the introduction of a Project Office facility may be beneficial to ensure the Service Portfolio is kept up to date.

The figure below illustrates where the various Service Status items fit in the Service Lifecycle.

Changes And Characteristics OF The 2011 Edition OF ITIL

Changes And Characteristics OF The 2011 Edition OF ITIL, ITIL 2007 Edition (previously known as version 3) is an extension of ITIL v2 and fully replaced it following the completion of the withdrawal period on 30 June 2011.[4] ITIL 2007 provides a more holistic perspective on the full life cycle of services, covering the entire IT organization and all supporting components needed to deliver services to the customer, whereas v2 focused on specific activities directly related to service delivery and support. Most of the v2 activities remained untouched in 2007, but some significant changes in terminology were introduced in order to facilitate the expansion.

 Changes And Characteristics OF The 2011 Edition OF ITIL


A summary of changes has been published by HM Government. In line with the 2007 edition, the 2011 edition consists of five core publications – Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation, and Continual Service Improvement. ITIL 2011 is an update to the ITIL framework that addresses significant additional guidance with the definition of formal processes which were previously implied but not identified, as well as correction of errors and inconsistencies.

There are twenty-six processes listed in ITIL 2011 edition and described below that shows which core publication provides the main content for each process.

ITIL 2007 has five volumes, published in May 2007 and updated in July 2011 as ITIL 2011 for consistency:

The Five Volumes :
  •     ITIL Service Strategy
  •     ITIL Service Design
  •     ITIL Service Transition
  •     ITIL Service Operation
  •     ITIL Continual Service Improvement

A Service Level Agreement

A Service Level Agreement or SLA, is fundamental to service provision, from the perspective of both the supplier and the recipient. It documents and defines the parameters of the relationship itself.

A Service Level Agreement, or SLA, is fundamental to service provision, from the perspective of both the supplier and the recipient. It documents and defines the parameters of the relationship itself.

A Service Level Agreement
The quality of the service level agreement is therefore a critical matter. It is not an area that can be left to chance, and must command careful attention.

To assist with this task, our service level agreement page considers service level agreements more closely, and identifies a simple but comprehensive resource to assist.


"Administration Level Agreements empowers constant observing of customers' IT framework to guarantee that desires are met as well as surpassed. IT foundations firmly lined up with their business targets and objectives and engage them to."